Tag: travel photograpy

Travel Photo Thursday: Visual Storytelling

Travel Photo Thursday: Visual Storytelling

Ever since Kodak introduced the “Brownie” camera back in 1900, rank amateurs have been able to create photographic souvenirs of their travels.

My family had one of these popular film cameras, and I still have an album filled with photos taken with it or similar, easy-to-use models.

But while taking photos was simple, sharing them was less “user-friendly,” as we would say in today’s digital age.

You could pass around a packet of prints that the drugstore made from your film, and talk about your trip.

Or you could set up a slide projector and screen, show tray after tray of your photos to a captive audience sitting around the dining room table after a meal ended, while “narrating” the events of your journey and facts about the places you had visited.

With the arrival of the Internet, photos could be attached to an e-mail or posted to online “albums” on Websites like Flickr. And smartphone cameras, apps like Instagram, and social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter, made it possible to share your trip photos with everyone in the entire known universe, even astronauts circling Earth.

However, telling a story visually, has remained somewhat elusive.

Using mobile apps or computer software, such as Apple’s iMovie, you can pull still photos (and video) into a “feature film,” adding music soundtracks and voice-over narration.

But for some of us, that takes more time and effort than we want to expend, and perhaps more technical know-how that we possess.

If you own an iPad, there’s now an easy way to combine the poetry of your words, striking photographic images, and entertaining video clips, into a digital “Story” using a free app called Storehouse. Tech Crunch calls it “long-form visual communication.”

Here’s how it works.

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Travel Photo Thursday: Winter Sunsets

Travel Photo Thursday: Winter Sunsets

Ask most people when sunsets are most dramatic and they would probably say “Summer.”

But what often makes a sunset worth photographing is not the sun itself, but the nature and extent of clouds in the sky as the sun goes down.

And that’s why in Northern California where I live and where summer skies are often cloud-free, winter is often the best time of the year to capture intense images of the sun sinking in the west.

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Travel Photo Thursday: Getting “Smart” about Cameras

Travel Photo Thursday: Getting “Smart” about Cameras

Nearly a year ago in “Travel Photo Thursday: Junk Your Camera!” I suggested that travelers might well iPhone 5 Camerathrow away their digital point-and-shoot or DSLR cameras in favor of using the cameras built into their smartphones.

A few months later, I did just the opposite: I bought a new Sony DSC-RX100 digital camera to replace my Canon Elph which I’d used for the past four years.

And while I do occasionally shoot still photos with my iPhone 5, I normally use it only for recording video.

But here’s a guy who proves that the iPhone (in his case, the iPhone 4) with an array of photography apps installed on it can work wonders with “street photography.”

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