Tag: travel photo tips

Travel Photo Thursday: The Problem with People in Photos

Travel Photo Thursday: The Problem with People in Photos

In  “Travel Photo Thursday: ‘People-ing’ Your Trip Photos” I stressed the importance of having people appear in the photos that you take when traveling.

And in “Travel Photo Thursday: ‘Scaling’ Your Shots with People” I showed you how having people appear in a photo can help the viewer visualize the size of hills, trees, and man-made structures.

But getting those people into (or out of) a shot can present several problems that photographers, including leisure travelers snapping away with a smartphone, usually don’t encounter when taking photos of landscapes or inanimate objects.

Read More Read More

Travel Photo Thursday: Perspectives

Travel Photo Thursday: Perspectives

Merriam-Webster offers the following definitions of “perspective”:

  • The technique or process of representing on a plane or curved surface the spatial relation of objects as they might appear to the eye; specifically :  representation in a drawing or painting of parallel lines as converging in order to give the illusion of depth and distance.
  • A visible scene; especially one giving a distinctive impression of distance.
  • The appearance to the eye of objects in respect to their relative distance and positions.

“Perspective” comes into play with various visual art forms, including photography.

Our eyes see the world in three dimensions: Width, height, and most importantly, depth.

But neither a painting on a flat canvas, a drawing on a sketch pad, nor a two-dimension photograph could easily impart a sense of depth or distance were it not for two important principles: The “vanishing point” and one-point or two-point “perspective.”

Read More Read More

Travel Photo Thursday: Shooting Panoramas

Travel Photo Thursday: Shooting Panoramas

According to Wikipedia,

Panoramic photography is a technique of photography, using specialized equipment or software, that captures images with elongated fields of view. It is sometimes known as wide format photography. The term has also been applied to a photograph that is cropped to a relatively wide aspect ratio.”

One of the most dramatic “panos” that I’ve ever seen is the one below showing the aftermath of the 1906 earthquake and fire which destroyed much of San Francisco.

Rather than being a single image, it is a composite “stitched together” out of four separate photographs.

But in the pre-digital age of photography, few, if any leisure travelers would have had the skill, equipment, or patience to create panoramic photos.

This is, not until Kodak came up with a nifty solution: Let the camera do the work.

Read More Read More