Tag: San Francisco

San Francisco’s “Hidden” Public Places, Public Art

San Francisco’s “Hidden” Public Places, Public Art

Like any large city, San Francisco has a myriad of government owned parks and plazas that are open to the public.

But unknown to many “locals” as well as visitors, are “Privately-Owned Public Open Space” (also know by the acronym, “POPOS”).

( David McSpadden Flickr Photo)
( David McSpadden Flickr Photo)

The city’s Planning Department says that they are “publicly accessible spaces in forms of plazas, terraces, atriums, small parks, and even snippets that are provided and maintained by private developers. In San Francisco, POPOS mostly appear in the Downtown office district area.”

The Department also points out that the city “has a ‘1% Art Program’ that requires that large projects in the Downtown and nearby neighborhoods provide public art that equals at least 1% of the total construction cost.”

But how do you find these places?

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Finding Fine Art in San Francisco

Finding Fine Art in San Francisco

I’m not an “Art Museum Kind of Guy.”

That doesn’t mean that I don’t appreciate “fine art” or “artsy-craftsy” art.

I’d just rather see it in place, someplace, rather than in a stuffy old museum.

(Dustin Gaffke Flickr Photo)
(Dustin Gaffke Flickr Photo)

But now and again, I make an exception to my general disinterest in visiting art museums, and in San Francisco, I make two.

Found in My Own Backyard: San Francisco’s Museum Gem,” took you on a virtual tour of one of those exceptions: The Legion of Honor, located in Lincoln Park, on the far west side of the city, just blocks from the Pacific Ocean.

This time I’ll show you the second of San Francisco’s Fine Art Museums, the deYoung in Golden Gate Park, a little less than three miles and an eight minute drive to the southeast of the Legion of Honor.

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Fog-Bound in Baghdad By The Bay

Fog-Bound in Baghdad By The Bay

It’s November.

Where I live just north of San Francisco, November means fog will be soon creep into my early mornings and late evenings on some days from now throughout winter.

It’s called “Tule Fog,” after the reedy plant that grows along the waterways of California’s Great Central Valley.

It hangs low to the ground in valleys surrounding, and sometimes low over the waters of, San Francisco Bay.

Some forms locally, the rest floats westward downstream along with the Sacramento-San Joaquin river flow carrying fresh water from “The Delta” to mix with the brine of the Pacific Ocean.

But that tule fog isn’t the one that turns blue the bare knees of Bermuda shorts-clad summer tourists shivering in Baghdad By The Bay.

That a different kettle of silvery fish-like fog altogether.

Winds blowing south along the Northern California coast cause cold ocean water to well up. Warmer air hanging over that upwelling cools, forming a stratus layer of clouds carried east over the coastal mountain range by westerly winds, through the sea-level gap in that range known as the Golden Gate, swallowing up much of the bridge named after the harbor’s entrance as it heads inland towards the Delta.

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