Tag: photography

National Geographic’s “Rarely Seen: Photographs of The Extraordinary”

National Geographic’s “Rarely Seen: Photographs of The Extraordinary”

Ask any reader of National Geographic magazine “Why do you subscribe?” and you’ll be told “It’s the photos, stupid!”

Although the magazine features some of the best-written stories about people and places you’ll find in any periodical, it has always been the photos used to illustrate the stories that has set off “NG” from other monthly publications.

An unexpected re-routing of a weekly hike that a local group that I recently joined does every Friday led me to discover yet more evidence of the preeminence of National Geographic photographers.

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Travel Photo Thursday: The “RAW” Truth

Travel Photo Thursday: The “RAW” Truth

Ever since I bought my first digital point-and-shoot camera several years ago, professional photographers have been urging me to record my digital images in “RAW” rather than JPEG format.

Their argument was that RAW photo files contained more “information” and, therefore, would produce much better final images.

View-Camera.jpg

Better photos sounds, well, better than no-as-good-as photos.

So why not shoot in RAW?

I couldn’t answer this question for a long time because the digital cameras I owned weren’t capable of saving my shots in RAW.

But that changed when I purchased a Sony RX-100 in the summer of 2013. And because I can now  simultaneously record images on my camera’s memory card in both JPEG and RAW formats, I did an experiment in which I shot a few photos in both and compared them to see which was best.

Here’s what I discovered.

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The Right to Bear Cameras

The Right to Bear Cameras

Kodak-Brownie.jpgCongress shall make no law…abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press.”

That’s the protection citizens gained when the First Amendment to the Constitution of the United States was ratified on December 15, 1791.

That amendment, of course, makes no specific mention of a freedom to photograph. Nearly a decade would pass before anyone tried to create what we might recognize as the photographic process, and over a hundred years would go by before consumers began buying cameras when the first of the Kodak “Brownie” line went on the market.

Now, thanks to the advent of smartphones and digital cameras, thousands if not millions of photographs are created every day by Americans while at home and traveling abroad.

But how free are we to shoot photos in the U.S.A., especially on government property bought and maintained with taxpayer dollars?

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