Tag: air travel

Dealing with Airline “Bumping” and Flight Cancellations

Dealing with Airline “Bumping” and Flight Cancellations

(Koka Sexton Flickr Photo)

Unless you’ve been living on the dark side of the Moon recently, you have heard about the United Airlines passenger who was dragged off a Chicago-to-Louisville flight after he refused to give up his seat to a member of United’s affiliate, Republic Airlines, who needed to reach Louisville to be available to work on a flight out of that city the next day.

United announced that it is taking steps to reduce overbooking, and JetBlue and Southwest are planning to eventually eliminate the practice altogether.

But while the odds of you being “involuntarily bumped” off an over-booked flight are quite low, the chances of you ending up “grounded” because of a flight delay or cancellation are high enough that you should know what to do to prevent that from happening or if you find yourself stuck at your departure airport.

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The “Golden Age” of Airline Advertising

The “Golden Age” of Airline Advertising

(Roger W Flickr Photo)

I’ve written before about the “Golden Age” of air travel when passengers actually looked forward to arrival at airports, checking in for flights, walking freely (along with friends or family who weren’t accompanying them on the trip) to the gate, and a relaxing, fun-filled journey to their destinations through “friendly skies.”

Whether you are too young to have experience the “fun of flying,” or have long since forgotten what it was like “back in the day,” you’ll find this collection of airline advertisements from 1934-1989 beyond belief today when airlines tout low fares rather than luxurious seating and attentive service even in Economy class cabins.

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Your Flight from The U.S. to Cuba Arrived, But Now What?

Your Flight from The U.S. to Cuba Arrived, But Now What?

The easing of restrictions on travel to Cuba by U.S. citizens announced by President Obama on December 17, 2014, has generated a great deal of interest of the part of Americans in visiting an island that during three decades of Cold War between the U.S. and Cuba’s staunch ally, the Soviet Union, was essentially off-limits.

After the U.S.S.R. crumbled in 1991, Cuba turned to tourism to bolster its economy and Americans began to travel there again on “people-to-people” cultural exchange tours, and such tours continue today.

But a major factor limiting travel from the U.S. to Cuba has been the lack of regularly scheduled air service, forcing Americans to either go on a group tour or try to snag an empty seat on a charter flight.

(NA Parish Flickr Photo)

That is about to change.

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