Month: April 2013

“Seattle in Motion”

“Seattle in Motion”

Watching a slideshow of still photos is a good way to get a feel for a city that you are planning to visit our have experienced as a tourist.

And as I’ve explained in past posts, you can create those slideshows in a number of different ways, incorporate them into videos made with Apple’s iMovie, or put them into a six-second “film” using the “Vine” smartphone app.

But one of the more fascinating ways to see a place is through time-lapse photography.

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Found in My Own Backyard: Great Photos of a Great Place

Found in My Own Backyard: Great Photos of a Great Place

Point Reyes National Seashore is a beautiful, wild place along the California Coast, just over an hour’s drive north of San Francisco, with mountains, beaches, bays, wildflowers, trees, that is home to deer, elk, and many other animals, including the lowly garden gopher.

But what sets it apart from populated areas north and south, are its sweeping vistas.

PointReyesTrip2

I wish I could claim credit for this triptych of black and white photos that hangs in my home.

But I didn’t shoot it.

Nor did California’s most famous photographer, Ansel Adams.

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Travel Photo Thursday: “Scaling” Trees

Travel Photo Thursday: “Scaling” Trees

What does it mean to “scale” a tree?

Tree ClimberOne definition of the verb “scale is “to reach the highest point of.” So to “scale a tree” could mean to climb it. (Photo by Scrap Pile via Flickr.)

“Scale” also means to measure, not just weight, but in the case of trees, to estimate how much lumber an uncut tree will produce when harvested.

When photographing trees, “scale” means giving the viewer a sense of the size of the tree. And, as I pointed out in “Travel Photo Thursday: Shooting The World’s Biggest Trees,” this can be a difficult task.

But there’s a simple solution to “scaling” trees with a camera: Put a person “in the frame.”

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