Category: Travel Photo Thursday

In An Icy National Park: Glacier Bay

In An Icy National Park: Glacier Bay

Margerie-Glacier_thumb.jpg
Margerie Glacier, Glacier Bay National Park

According to the Glacier Bay National Park Website,

“When Captain George Vancouver charted adjacent waters of Icy Strait in 1794, he and his crew described what we now call Glacier Bay as just a small five-mile indent in a gigantic glacier that stretched off to the horizon. That massive glacier was more than 4,000 feet thick in places, up to 20 miles wide, and extended more than 100 miles to the St. Elias mountain range.

“By 1879, however, naturalist John Muir discovered that the ice had retreated more than 30 miles forming an actual bay.

“By 1916, the Grand Pacific Glacier – the main glacier credited with carving the bay – had melted back 60 miles to the head of what is now Tarr Inlet.”

Modern-day visitors to the park can sail far up into the bay, either in their own craft, on a cruise ship, or a park concessionaire tour boat, and get fairly “up close and personal” with the remaining glaciers.

Glacier Bay CollageBut not everything at Glacier Bay worth seeing and photographing is made of ice.

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Photographing Coastal National Parks

Photographing Coastal National Parks

In June of this year, while touring New England, I plan to spend some time in a U.S. National Park that I’ve long known about, but never visited, let alone photographed: Acadia.

(Kim Carpenter Flickr Photo)
(Kim Carpenter Flickr Photo)

Located along Maine’s coast, the scenery should produce plenty of “photo ops.”

But although that coastline will be new to me, shooting photos in coast-side national parks is something I’ve been doing for over 40 years.

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