Travel Photo Thursday: Perspectives

June 26, 2014

in Travel Photo Thursday

  • SumoMe

Merriam-Webster offers the following definitions of “perspective”:

  • The technique or process of representing on a plane or curved surface the spatial relation of objects as they might appear to the eye; specifically :  representation in a drawing or painting of parallel lines as converging in order to give the illusion of depth and distance.
  • A visible scene; especially one giving a distinctive impression of distance.
  • The appearance to the eye of objects in respect to their relative distance and positions.

“Perspective” comes into play with various visual art forms, including photography.

Our eyes see the world in three dimensions: Width, height, and most importantly, depth.

But neither a painting on a flat canvas, a drawing on a sketch pad, nor a two-dimension photograph could easily impart a sense of depth or distance were it not for two important principles: The “vanishing point” and one-point or two-point “perspective.”

In the opening lines of Vanishing Away: Stanley Kubrick, eat your heart out, San Francisco Bay Area photographer Tristan O’Tierney says about his perspective:

“I’ve always had a soft spot for vanishing points and single point perspectives. There’s something sort of hypnotic about them. You lose yourself, and get sucked into the scene.”

His photographic examples of “perspective” were shot at a number of places familiar to me, including the  Golden Gate Bridge, the Highway 1 tunnel that bypasses “Devil’s Slide” south of San Francisco, the Montreal Metro, and the Chicago Loop.

After clicking on “View Story” to see O’Tierney’s remarkable images, follow his advice:

Now Go. Find your endless path – the one that you fall into hopelessly, and make it yours.”

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