Month: June 2014

Making Trip Photos into Movies

Making Trip Photos into Movies

You return from vacation determined this time to come up with a way to turn the photos you took into a visually compelling story of your journey.

Last Friday, I explained how Google+, the free Storehouse app for iPad, and the Website Exposure.co can do that job for you. But all of them do so via “scrapbook or “visual essay,” and none of them produce “movies.”

Here are three ways that you can make your photos into a “moving” experience using software for either Apple Mac computers or the iPad.

Read More Read More

Travel Photo Thursday: Perspectives

Travel Photo Thursday: Perspectives

Merriam-Webster offers the following definitions of “perspective”:

  • The technique or process of representing on a plane or curved surface the spatial relation of objects as they might appear to the eye; specifically :  representation in a drawing or painting of parallel lines as converging in order to give the illusion of depth and distance.
  • A visible scene; especially one giving a distinctive impression of distance.
  • The appearance to the eye of objects in respect to their relative distance and positions.

“Perspective” comes into play with various visual art forms, including photography.

Our eyes see the world in three dimensions: Width, height, and most importantly, depth.

But neither a painting on a flat canvas, a drawing on a sketch pad, nor a two-dimension photograph could easily impart a sense of depth or distance were it not for two important principles: The “vanishing point” and one-point or two-point “perspective.”

Read More Read More

“Droning” Over National Parks

“Droning” Over National Parks

Since I shoot video when I travel and have produced a few TV travel “shorts,” I’ve been intrigued with the idea of using a miniature helicopter, such as the Phantom 2 Vision Drone, to make my own version of  travelogues like “Over Hawaii.”

Drone
(Iansblog Flickr Photo)

But there’s one set of places where I won’t be able to do filming from the air: U.S national parks.

And that’s either good or bad news for aspiring filmmakers and park visitors.

Read More Read More