Travel Photo Thursday: “Southeast”

April 10, 2014

in Travel Photo Thursday

  • SumoMe

A mere 75,000 humans are scattered across 35,000 square miles of the Alaska Panhandle, living in widely dispersed pockets of civilization unconnected to each other by road.

In summer, their ranks temporarily swell by a million or more souls who arrive by ferry, plane, but mainly on cruise ships, to marvel at and photograph the immensely scenic landscape, chow down on fresh salmon and halibut, fly to a glacier in a helicopter to do a “walk about,” go “flightseeing” in a floatplane, ride a dogsled, or shop-until-they-drop in shore-side stores.

Westerdam Sets Sail, Sitka

But who wants to live in “Southeast,” as the locals call it? And should you move there?

I explored these questions in this three-minute “Sense of Place” film which aired last week on MarinTV, the “public access” cable TV channel in my home county and where I’m a producer and have been a crew member on shows shot in the studio and in the field.

As you’ve seen, “Southeast” – Life in The Alaska Panhandle, was actually made entirely from still photos using the Apple iMovie program on my iMac desktop computer. The narration was recorded with GarageBand on my iMac. The photos were all shot with a Canon Digital Elph point-and-shoot camera.

The “Ken Burns Effect”—named after the famous American documentary filmmaker whose works have appeared on PBS TV in the United States, and in which Burn’s video camera zooms in and out, and pans across still photos—was applied to nearly all of the photos in my film, giving it a “moving picture” quality.

(Visit Budget Travelers Sandbox for more of this week’s Travel Photo Thursday shots.)

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